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10 Photos of Objects Cut In Half to Reveal the Things That Are Just Rarely Seen

Curiosity is human nature. We are born to wonder everything around us and to question the every unknown.  That is why some kids would cut their new toys in half just to see what is inside, and if you are just like them, then this list will feel just perfect for you. These 10 photos will answer your question: “what will it look like if I saw it in half?” Put your saws and scissors back from where you got them as these people have already done the dirty job for you and have taken pictures of it as well so that you won’t have to anymore.

Here are 10 photos of objects cut in half to feast your eyes into:

1. Canon Camera

Photo Credit: Leotopia

The very first canon camera will be celebrating its 85th birthday this 2019. The camera was called Kwanon at first; it was named after Kwannon, the Buddhist goddess of mercy. The engineers named it that way as they hoped to entice the god to “share her benevolence as they pursued their dream to produce the world’s finest camera.”

2. Land Rover

Maurice Wilks is the innovative person who designed the original Land Rover who modeled it after the US-made jeeps from the World War 2. He decided to keep the vehicle’s layout simple and looking like a tractor, as it was conceived to be an agricultural vehicle that is why he put the steering wheel in the middle. This also meant that the Rover could dodge the nuisance of building 2 different versions of the same vehicle, the left-hand and the right-hand drive markets.

3. Mechanical Calculator

Photo Credit: kymray

Maurice Wilks is the innovative person who designed the original Land Rover who modeled it after the US-made jeeps from the World War 2. He decided to keep the vehicle’s layout simple and looking like a tractor, as it was conceived to be an agricultural vehicle that is why he put the steering wheel in the middle. This also meant that the Rover could dodge the nuisance of building 2 different versions of the same vehicle, the left-hand and the right-hand drive markets.

4. CT Scanner

Photo Credit: Chap82

This is the Computed Tomography Scan but formerly known as Computerized Axial Tomography Scan or CAT scan. This machine allows the professionals who know how to use it see inside a particular object that is scanned without cutting. By using computer processed combinations of many X-ray measurements that are taken from different angles, this scanner can produce cross-sectional or tomographic images of the object scanned.

5. Bowling Balls

That thing you see inside the bowling ball is what you call the weight block. This enables the ball to roll down the lane properly by giving it momentum. Not all manufacturers make the same core though, thus making some light bulb shaped while others are elliptical and some may even be a combination of both. Manufacturers add their own styles on the cores they are making but all of them provide the momentum for the ball to roll down the lane properly.

6. Military Tank

Photo Credit: RaymondPowellIII

This heavy-armored vehicle was first used in combat in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette on September 15, 1916. Most of us are familiar with the concept of a military tank but not everyone knows that the polite Brits were the one introduced it during the First World War.

7. New Zealand Rock

Photo Credit: pitcher654

Located at the Tasman Bay off the northern coast of the South Island of New Zealand, you can find the rock called Tokangawhā or Split Apple Rock. The fracture of the rock has formed because of the constant exposure to rain and waves. However, the traditional Maori mythology believes that the fracture occurred when two gods broke the rock apart by themselves. It may just be a rock cut in half but it is still undeniably a pleasure to behold.

8. Tortoise Skeleton

Photo Credit: fubbleskag

Tortoises’ and turtle’s shell are both a blessing and a curse. It is a blessing because it serves as a protective armor that shields them from different kinds of harm. But it is also a curse that weigh them down for the rest of their lives rendering them very slow. The outer layer – carapace – is the shell that we see on the animal and beneath it hides the inner bony layer, then followed by the rib bones. While the lower shell of the tortoise is called a plastron.

9. Adding Machine

Photo Credit: crystalandrockyfinds

Back on the 1970s, an adding machine is an essential part of almost every office as much as how computers are to us nowadays. It is a class of mechanical calculators and was usually used for book keeping calculations. Calculators were prominent on the 70s up to early 90s too. However, they were rapidly replaced by personal computers as the go to device for offices worldwide. By the year 2000, adding machines were now completely phased out.

10. Bloodwood tree (Pterocarpus angolensis)

Found in southern Africa, the blood wood tree is a very unusual tree because it sheds its leaves seasonally. The tree got its name because its sap produces bright red which closely resembles the color of human blood. The Pterocarpus is much valued in Africa, as it provides a beautiful timber which is easy to work with. Most commonly used for building furniture and canoes because the its wood does not shrink that much like others do.

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